Author Archives: Gustavo A. Silva-Chávez

Gus Silva-Chávez is the REDDX program manager at Forest Trends. He has worked on REDD+, land use, agriculture and climate issues for 15 years.


On the Road after Paris – Next Stop: Bonn/Fiji

This year’s climate talks may not be as glamorous or high-profile as the Conference of Parties to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change that adopted the historic Paris Agreement two years ago, but the agenda for COP23 that starts Monday in Bonn is packed with key issues that need to be resolved to fully implement the Agreement.

 

Credit: Mettus / Shutterstock.com

Credit: Mettus / Shutterstock.com

It has been almost two years since countries adopted the historic Paris Agreement at the COP21 in …

New Report Tracks the Impact of Forest Finance in Brazil

Brazil has been recognized as a leader in global efforts to reduce deforestation and associated greenhouse gas emissions—mostly due to the successful implementation of forest conservation policies that reduced deforestation in the Amazon by 80% below historical levels, and prevented more than 5 billion tons of CO2 from reaching the atmosphere over the last decade. Brazil showed that the policy known as Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD+), could work in practice. Unfortunately, since 2016, deforestation levels …

Exiting the Paris Agreement Doesn’t Make America Great

Yesterday’s decision by the US administration to exit the Paris Climate Agreement will not make America or the world great. It is a decision that ignores basic science and turns its back to the global efforts to fight climate change. The Paris Agreement, by design, provides flexibility that the US could have used, if it had concerns about specific aspects of the agreement, such as lowering the costs by allowing the use of market mechanisms like cap-and-trade.

The US exit …

Climate Negotiators Roll Up Their Sleeves in Bonn, With or Without the U.S.

As the next round of climate talks get underway in Bonn, the question on everyone’s mind is whether the United States government will stay in the Paris Agreement – and, if so, under what conditions. Many expect the Trump Administration to reach a final verdict any day now, and its decision will obviously have profound effects that reach far beyond this week’s negotiations. But, as always, the show must go on, and negotiators in Bonn will continue hammering out important …

The Paris Agreement Takes Flight; What’s Next in Marrakesh?

Last Friday, the Paris Agreement entered into force way ahead of schedule – less than a year after the gavel came down to adopt the climate agreement last December. This week, as nations’ representatives meet in Marrakesh, Morocco for the next annual UN climate conference (COP22), they’ll look to take an important step toward putting the landmark agreement to work.

Back in 1997, when the Kyoto Protocol was negotiated and agreed to, it took almost eight agonizing years to take …

The Missing Link in Protecting Forests

What’s the biggest missing link in finding the money needed to protect forests?

It’s not political will or public finance – though more is certainly needed – nor is it formal UN recognition of their importance; forests achieved that last December in Paris. What’s missing is the untapped power of the private sector.

One of the big surprises that came out of the Paris Agreement was the explicit recognition of the key role that forests (and land use, including agriculture) …

Slow Strides in Building the Paris Agreement Rulebook

Picking up where climate negotiators left off in Paris last December, the recent UN climate meetings in Bonn ended with slow progress on procedural issues, and as expected, there were no major substantive decisions. Bonn provided a forum for the bodies within the Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) that deal with the technical and scientific aspects of climate negotiations, and its primary focus was to begin the unglamorous, yet critically important, work of creating the rules that will govern …

The Next Challenge – How to Make the Paris Agreement Work

Paris gave us the blueprint and the political signal

As important as the Paris COP was in delivering a historic climate agreement, the biggest challenge now is putting the Paris Agreement (PA) to work — or “operationalizing” it — in a quick manner so that countries can begin implementing their national climate plans, known as National Determined Contributions (NDCs).

That daunting task first falls to climate negotiators meeting in Bonn, Germany this week, where they’ll begin to hammer out some …

Forests Win Big in the Paris Agreement

The global climate agreement reached in Paris marks a historic moment for forests as they are now enshrined in international climate action. All countries agreed on simple but strong language that operationalizes forest protection and flips the ‘on’ switch for the international finance to make it happen. It also brings in the necessary technical and scientific rules to make sure there is the blueprint to build national forest protection plans. In doing so, they expanded the opportunities for forests to …

Latest Paris Text Shows Emergence of a REDD+ Package

The latest draft Paris agreement text released today shows that negotiators have made significant progress this week. Since the ADP co-chairs released the last version on Sunday, we’ve seen major reductions in the number of pages (from 47 to 29), options, and brackets (down 79%). And when the text was presented to countries today, no one immediately objected to the text – a good sign, history shows. Countries and NGOs are currently reviewing the draft agreement, and they will reconvene …